Category Archives: Nature

You leave me…

Whites

Speechless!
What could I say that wouldn’t fall short
Of describing your true beauty, softness, and elegance
Staring longer would only draw me further away from reality
Lost in thoughts, imagining, forgetting who, what, where we are
Nevertheless, for this fleeting moment, I found myself
Searching for words to describe a feeling, but failed
Some things better remain unsaid, some words unspoken
A thought came to mind as I walked away
I just kept going quietly
We both knew
Enough said

Can’t See the Forest…

Tulips

… for the tulips.

I know, it’s not how the saying goes. “You can’t see the forest, for the trees,” is the more common expression. But I couldn’t help myself. With my lens at ground level, surrounded in red and white flowers reminiscent of the Canadian flag, among green leaves and stems, I realized I could no longer see the thicket of cedars a few feet beyond. I smiled and thought of this overused idiom, amused. I could no longer see the forest for the tulips…

Wink!

Great Grey Owl

This is the last of the winged visitors I met at the Indigo bookstore. This beautiful monocled great grey owl has been taken in by the folks at the Prairie Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre after he was hit by a car. The collision injured his left eye, which had to be surgically removed.   That didn’t stop him from keeping a close eye on me.

This is the largest of the owl family, with a wingspan that can reach 152 cm. I’m told that its size is somewhat deceptive, made up mostly of fluffy and broad feathers. It is rather lightweight.

Where did I put it?

Maui (1347 of 2119)
A couple of Ruddy Turnstones at at the Keālia Pond National Wildlife Refuge, on the Hawaiian island of Maui

I first met ruddy turnstones on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, at the entrance of the Bay of Tampa. From our very first encounter, it was impossible to forget their name (although I didn’t know the name at the time we met) because that is exactly what turnstones do: they turn stones on the beach looking for insects and other little creatures they can eat, quickly moving from one stone to the next, never staying in place for very long.

These two were enjoying the white foam on the shores of Keālia Pond on Maui.

Hey, look over here!
This one looks so familiar.
No, must be elsewhere…

Out of its shell…

Maui (131 of 2119)
Giant African Snail (this one was the size of a fist) on the wall

Native to Africa, this large snail was brought to Hawai‘i in 1936 as a garden ornamental and to be eaten. It is the largest land snail in Hawai‘i (can get up to 8 inches [ca. 20 cm] in length) and is considered an invasive pest because it feeds on the tender green leaves of garden and crop plants throughout the islands.